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20121224
20130101
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CSPAN 26
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
mikes if you will queue at the mikes we will take your turn and we will end promptly at 8:30 which gives us about 20 minutes. >> i appear to have answered every question. >> thanks for coming. what would you see -- one of the arguments for less government involvement with things is that if people hold on to their money more, they would be in a position to take care of the poor, the oh pressed etc. can you imagine where else that might come from? do you think it's possible for those people to be taken care of outside of a religious context and outside of a political context and are there any examples of that in other government? >> i am not denying the role which americans of all political persuasions now agree on that the state has in applying a social safety net. i am saying there are potential cost to this and not only financial cost. there is a cost of a crowding out of private initiative, a crowding out of charity. an off loading of all social responsibilities on to the state. it is indicative surely of something important that the chartable impulse in the united states is far strong
. it is at supersonic for reentry. the reason it does is that mike adams got killed while i was working at edwards during reentry. he did not have the pitch accurate within about that much range and he did not have the yaw accurate within about that much rain, and that haunted me. i thought that was the reason we would not have commercial space flight. the pilot for spaceshipone reentry -- by the way, there is not autopilot. the only thing controlling those controls are the rudder pedals on a mock 0.3 airplane. you have the electric fin on the tail. just like a piper cub. [laughter] weird, huh? you could be at apogee in spaceshipone, eat your lunch, handoff, and do as a free entry -- safe reentry. you're not putting yourself at risk like mike adams put himself at risk. this is just a picture is google earth. out to the right is the white knight climbing 50% more altitude than an airliner. going up about 50,000 feet. from up there, about 70 miles, you're looking on the horizon. this is why we stopped flying space ships. i wanted to fly one every five months to show reliability and cost for future s
, that one is a real significant. in most dangerous flight -- mike had to recover from a tail stall. this was a glide like, not a space flight. by the way, the guy on the left, he is now the ceo of scaled. you can see that the discussion -- we are really getting good data back and forth here. i mean, he is just about out of the space ship. and things that were said there are probably the most important things, more important than the final record of the flight. when i write my memoirs, which i think i will just published on my website, i will tell you what i am telling the faa administrator over in the corridor here. faa was the one that regulates these test flights. that is an interesting story. i have to go back a few years for a. seek out the experience and learn for them. peering into the rocket nozzle of spaceshipone -- one of the rocket scientists came over with von braun in 1946. he died just this last year. i tried to involve these guys. max does not have an engineering degree, but he is the one who designed the shape of the mercury capsule. you know, that dome on the bottom
caller. go ahead, mike. caller: i would say no, religion, whether a politician is whatever religion -- mormon, as far as romney, it does not influence. but to judge in the fruits of the politicians we are voting on, that is what we should look at. i would say, yes, religion guides my life, so it will guide my choices. i judge of the fruits of those politicians. like the one gentleman earlier was saying about people who are only worried about the rich. that is not in the bible. thanks, greta, and thanks for c- span. host: republican caller. mississippi. caller: i am a religious person and i have been my whole life. when of the greatest people i watch on television is david jeremiah. but my religion has always taught me that we have to take care of each other. i am a retired firefighter. i say that after jesus christ, firefighters love you the most because they are willing to sacrifice your life. but in this world, we have succumbed to the love of money, which is the root of all evil. rather than listen to answers that i think are given to us, we love money so much that we turn to try
from mike -- go to mike from the independent line. caller: i would like to say that this fiscal cliff is a charade. it is promoted by the media. it has nothing to do with fixing our economy. the president has had an opportunity to go to the g-7 or the 20 and explain that western civilization is in debt so far that it is never going to get out of it unless we abandon these world trade rules, everybody go home to their own country, and do with the need to do to get back on the even keel with their financing. host: are using the u.s. should pull back from its international commitments and focus more on -- more on home? caller: i would suggest that other western countries do the same thing. the president should have his staff identify the most labour intensive products that we purchased here in the u.s. and stop importing them. he should say, for example, the automotive parts and automobiles -- six months from now, he should say, we're not going to allow any imports. the creek investors -- greedy investors will go to work and start making plans and getting plants to fill that void. by tha
. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you have a certain risk factor. was it really great? was it only seem great because i was there or because i was young? fortunately, the answer turned out to be, no. i discovered something that was there in plain sight, but had not been noticed. if you googled the words "great senate" you'll find nothing other than my bo
without the other. that was the comment on my facebook page from mike in texas. the american people get it. government does not because washington is addicted to spending someone else's money. the house has passed two bills to avert the fiscal cliff. the senate is missing in action. in august, we passed into a partisan bill, an extension of current rates for all americans through the end of 2013. the week before christmas, the house passed legislation to avoid sequestration by cutting spending. as usual, both bills lie in the graveyard of the senate. it is time for the senate to get serious about the root of the problem, spending. we got here by spending too much, not taxing too little. that is just the way it is. >> for what purpose does the gentleman from ohio rise? without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> the anasazi were the cliff dwellers that build extraordinary places to live. in 1300 a.d., these great architects disappeared. the people of this great nation are dwelling on real cliffs' of fiscal and security -- fiscal in security. the cliffs of small busines
. >> richard man will give the mike to the individuals and identify youself and what your question is. >> i'm a reporter with lrp publications. in the chart that talked about the $1 trillion in cuts that have been made. i think it was 16 billion came from pay freeze and some changes in retirement for federal employees. >> right. >> what i was wondering is do you think that additional changes are on the table in that area, for example continuation of the freeze for another period of time and do you think they should? >> first of all, i don't know because i'm not privy to what is in the proposal of 200 billion of additional savings out of other accounts. one must assume that there must be additional save frgs federal employees. i proposed a smaller package of other mandatory savings in light of what has already been done. in my farewell speech i talked about another 150 billion mandatory. are there more savings from federal employees? yes i think there is because the retirement is very generous. i do worry that it could go too far. certainly the republican proposal for 300 billion of savings
tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-chair politics aside 2012 just like 2010 and he of course is a ran strust tee so we're delighted to have him. he'll moderate tonight. and with him and i'll ask the panel to come forward. howard gor dan and michael sheen. >> figs of all, thank you for being here this evening and thank you for being here on a friday night. i don't do this for a live sog you're going to have to fill in in the middle. let's start off shes we all know the wonderful shows and movies you've been involved with, many of which have overlapped with politics from "homeland," "the queen", so the first thing i'd like to ask -- i'd like to talk about the shows "homeland" and "the queen." where did those come from in the first place? >> "24" came from a basic idea, two writers. joel said it was an in the shower idea. i'm thinking about television and in television there are 22 or 24 episodes in a season, thinking about the number 24 and said could you do an entire series of television over the course of one day. and i was an executive at fox at the tim
they have to read it twice, and so it's not -- they say it's too technical. so we need clearer -- maybe mike's book because i haven't read it yet, but -- >> but your -- but your next book is gonna be letters to your granddaughter. >> yeah, my next book is gonna be sophie's planet. and sophie is helping me. i'm writing her letters and making sure they're understandable to her. >> and sophie is a teenager? >> sophie is now 14. she's my oldest grandchild. and i'm gonna try to make this understandable, more understandable. >> i'm sure she's smart. let's have our next question. yes, sir, welcome. >> yeah, hi. i'm nils michael langenborg from sustainable adam smith. congratulations from the award. so adam smith wrote about -- he said consumption is the sole end and purpose of all production. so if consumption is really the issue here, how do we get all -- how do we get everyday americans to modify their consumption, and how do we get policy makers like governor brown who's sitting in the room here, spoiler alert, and what is his position on this, i would be more than happy to hear. so how do we ge
. [applause]>> we are having time for a q&a. the format is we have standing mike's at these two aisles. if you will line up at the mike's. -- mics. this gives us about 20 minutes. >> i appear to have answered every question. >> inc. you for coming. -- thank you for coming. one of the arguments for less government involvement is that, if people hold onto their money more, they will be in a position to take care of the poor and oppressed, etc.. can you imagine where else that might come from? do you think it is possible for those able to be taken care of outside of a religious context and political context? is there an >> i am not denying the role, which americans of all political persuasions agree on. the state has been supplying a social safety net. there are potential costs to this. i do not just mean financial cost. there is a cost of a crowding out of private initiatives. crowding out of charity. and offloading of these onto the state. it is indicative of something important that the charitable impulse of the united states is stronger than in europe. welfare states are stronger in europe th
recommend his web site. i think mike at "the daily beast" has written about this. i know a lot of people have raised a lot of issues about that. host: david from "the washington post" writes in his column this morning -- what do you think of the sentiment that he writes about? guest: let me say this for the record. i am a big fan of his and his novels. if you ever want to read a great spy novel, i recommend his first novel. he writes in the beginning that this is a work of fiction. but the reason he writes that is because it is well known among people like myself that even though it is a fictional book, it covers a lot of the same bases as the cia but the relationship in the 1970's when they were considered a terrorist organization. he has some of the best sources in the intelligence community in washington. i do not share his optimism about the taliban. at this point, it would be great if there could be an understanding as the united states left and what the taliban's role would be in this new government. that wille necessarily work out at this point. it is a difficult problem, i think,
from mike out in florida. caller: good morning. i am a bit pessimistic. i believe that on c-span they had an economist on here explaining how americans do not understand the difference between millions, billions, in trillions. with the trillions of dollars in debt, he put it into the context of time. 1 million seconds will take 11 days to pass. 1 billion seconds will pass in 32 years. when trillion seconds will pass in 32,000 years. i think it is almost impossible to see how we will ever pay off this debt. that is all i have to say. host: that was mike from florida. plenty more time for your calls, facebook postings, and it tweets.- tonight on prime time we're going to sit down with a couple of retiring members of congress. dan burton and kent conrad. a little snippet from each interview. we will show you now congressman burton. [video clip] >> i would like for people to think, he might have been a bulldog, but he was a man who believed in honesty and integrity of things that were right for this country. regardless of how difficult it was, he kept to those principles. i hope
&a. we have standing mikes if you will queue at the mikes we will take your turn and we will end promptly at 8:30 which gives us about 20 minutes. >> i appear to have answered every question. >> thanks for coming. what would you see -- one of the arguments for less government involvement with things is that if people hold on to their money more, they would be in a position to take care of the poor, the oh pressed etc. can you imagine where else that might come from? do you think it's possible for those people to be taken care of outside of a religious context and outside of a political context and are there any examples of that in other government? >> i am not denying the role which americans of all political persuasions now agree on that the state has in applying a social safety net. i am saying there are potential cost to this and not only financial cost. there is a cost of a crowding out of private initiative, a crowding out of charity. an off loading of all social responsibilities on to the state. it is indicative surely of something important that the chartable impulse in the united
it does is that mike adams got killed while i was working at edwards during reentry. he did not have the pitch accurate within about that much range and he did not have the yaw accurate within about that much rain, and that haunted me. i thought that was the reason we would not have commercial space flight. the pilot for spaceshipone reentry -- by the way, there is not autopilot. the only thing controlling those controls are the rudder pedals on a mock 0.3 airplane. you have the electric fin on the tail. just like a piper cub. [laughter] weird, huh? you could be at apogee in spaceshipone, eat your lunch, handoff, and do as a free entry -- safe reentry. you're not putting yourself at risk like mike adams put himself at risk. this is just a picture is google earth. out to the right is the white knight climbing 50% more altitude than an airliner. going up about 50,000 feet. from up there, about 70 miles, you're looking on the horizon. this is why we stopped flying space ships. i wanted to fly one every five months to show reliability and cost for future space tourism. however, the histo
, boston post, and the wall street thurmont. mike is joining us from lafayette, louisiana, independent line. caller: good morning. you're talking about the need for special forces, working in conjunction with other nations' forces. are we running the risk of creating a u.n. special forces or creating a new world order special forces group? guest: well, they have many partners about the world now. this is one of the focal points of the new commander's efforts, to pull together regional alliances of special operators to help do some of these projects, which lessens the burden on the u.s. special operations forces who they have been operating at a very high temple for a decade. i will give you one quick example. there are a lot of nato and east european in new zealand, australia, other countries have sent special operations forces to afghanistan. they have been working over the last decade. they're not all doing the killing, capturing, hunting, the unilateral trade missions. many of them are partnered with these special provincial response companies. they are special police units in 17 of the
technical. so we need clearer -- maybe mike's book because i haven't read it yet, but -- >> but your -- but your next book is gonna be letters to your granddaughter. >> yeah, my next book is gonna be sophie's planet. and sophie is helping me. i'm writing her letters and making sure they're understandable to her. >> and sophie is a teenager? >> sophie is now 14. she's my oldest grandchild. this'm gonna try to make understandable, more understandable. >> i'm sure she's smart. let's have our next question. yes, sir, welcome. >> i'm nils michael langenborg from sustainable adam smith. congratulations from the award. so adam smith wrote about -- he said consumption is the sole end and purpose of all production. so if consumption is really the issue here, how do we get all -- how do we get everyday americans to modify their consumption, and how do we get policy makers like governor brown who's sitting in the room here, spoiler alert, and what is his position on this, i would be more than happy to hear. so how do we get people to be -- to change their behavior? and, secondarily, how we make
on. that was their message and that was not a bad message. >> you also told mike allen of political that you did nothing to the romney campaign emphasized that. >> i don't think they flushed him out enough. you have to be fully dimensional. it is not like any other office. people have to know who you are. they have to feel comfortable with who you are. whatever message you build, it has to be built around your biography and it has to be compelling. the romney campaign spent at least 90% of the money in the primary on negative ads and never spent time flushing it out, and developing a portrait of who romney was. after he won the rock -- after he won the nomination, we expected them to do that and create stronger sense among the american people as to who he was. they never did that. that left an opening. >> i want to talk more about the election campaign. let's stick with the chronology. you talked about the mid a tarrative -- the mets narrative. >> i think it is important. the iop and my basic approach to politics is rooted in the belief that it is more than just a game of tactics, s
a champion mike aung san suu kyi. -- like on songs hoochy like aung san suu kyi -- like aung san suu kyi. in the face of violence, harassment, intimidation, she has never wavered in her pursuit of human rights. she celebrates the release of political prisoners, including the approximately 90 released this week, but she remains true to those still behind bars, estimated to be around twothis woman sacrifice years of her life to bring about these changes. she is truly an inspiration to the world. you are so well deserving of this gold medal. i can only begin to express my happiness that we are able to present this to you today in this very special place, a very special woman. thank you. [applause] >> ladies and gentleman, the senator from the state of arizona, the honorable john mccain. >> at my age, i try to be realistic about how many more times i will be surprised by a wonderful and unexpected turn of events. i might of hope, but i am not -- i might have hoped, but i am not sure i expected that one day i would have be honor of welcoming my personal hero, aung san suu kyi, to the congress
to create jobs and so on. that was their message and that was not a bad message. >> you also told mike allen of political that you did nothing to the romney campaign emphasized that. >> i don't think they flushed him out enough. you have to be fully mensional. it is not like any other office. people have to know who you are. they have to feel comfortable with who youre. whatever message you build, it has toe built around your biography and it has to be compelling. the romney campaign spent at least 90% of the money in the primary on negative ads and never spent time flushing it out, and developing a portrait of who romney was. after he won the rock -- after he won the nomination, we expected them to do that and create stronger sense among the american people as to who he was. they never did that. that left an opening. >> i want to talk more about the election campaign. let's stick with the chronology. yotalked about the mid a tarrative -- the mets narrative. >> i think it is important. the iop and my basic approach to politics is rooted in the belief that it is more than just a game of tacti
a fiscal of deal, we want to look at other items this morning. this is from "the new york times." mike on the line for independents. your thoughts on that the senate negotiating the fiscal clift deal? caller: i would like to take a step back. this is a discussion on philosophies. i think the basic difference in philosophy between two parties. i think the solution really is to come up with an agreement that will make everybody equally unhappy and explain that this is for the benefit of all of our children. host: what would be an agreement that would make everybody unhappy? caller: if you told republicans there would be means testing and they are not going to get some of the benefits like medicare or social security because they have wealth in their lives, it would make them happy, but they could afford it. if you told democrats that we are going to cut some benefits to try to get the deficit under control -- if this other republicans are also taking cuts, maybe they would go along with the things. i think there are a lot of people in the system that the benefits that they do not need. h
. [applause] b. mike thank you, mr. speaker. what youth unemployment is at its highest, so is help available for 16 to 24-year-olds. while in 17 support for me to get ready for work, what about the 11, 12 and 13-year-olds that you and i were present? is a concern that they share? how is that for them to be the uk's primary campaign? by number of young people without jobs personages 0.5% between this and last year, the number of apprenticeships started in the same. with nearly half a million. getting ready for us and need to be the uk's primary campaign. inspiring the future, an example of a new game we see employees across the u.k. going to secondary scores to talk about their jobs, careers and education respect to get where they are now. victor schools have already signed up and more follow. getting ready for work should not be the u.k. youth parliament campaign. yes, there is a very high level of unemployment and it is very turning, but this is by thursday 1 billion pounds funding from the 160,000 employers working the job center plus and 250,000 new work experience. the result is a creati
of a fiscal cliff and they are still on vacation. >> let's go to mike in texas, on our line for republicans. >> i agree with the first guy. i wish they would have a little backbone and force obama and reid into not giving in to them. they need to set a budget and stick with a budget, and what they are trying to do is they want more money so they can increase the debt again, and they are about to run this country, as far as i am content. host: out the you think this will end up? caller: i hope boehner holds to his guns. i think the million-dollar deal is a good deal where anybody making over a million dollars pace a little bit more money, but i do not buy that $250 deal. host: that's good to marry in florida. c-span.e on caller: i believe the average american should not have to pay taxes. caller: you are going to need to turn down your tv, ok? caller: i do not have been on. it could be somebody else playing district. -- playing this trick. host: we will stay in florida and go to venice. did you see what minority whip hoyer had to say? caller: yes, i did, and being a democrat i go along with
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)